SSWIMT: Swimming Research

WHAT IS… SSWIMT?

Research on swimming is broad and essential for the evolution of the sport. The level of swimming related scientific research is very advanced, as is the level of coaching. However, as both fields are very demanding, their connection, in terms of knowledge and experience diffusion, is difficult.

In-depth reading of scientific papers is needed for a thorough interpretation of their results. However, this is usually time consuming and difficult for non-accustomed readers. The short display (shorter than their abstract) of interesting articles in a simple manner, without meddling, for someone to figure out if an article is helpful (and then go on with full-text reading), is our main intention. Additionally, useful notes from the coaching practice that are based on testing will be posted. The purpose is to assist swimming coaches and relevant sport scientists to keep up with the swimming research progress.

So sswimt comes to accelerate the dissemination of information and updates on swimming testing and research with a focus on physiology, biochemistry, metabolism, nutrition and training!  Our goal is to set off the abundant information provided by eminent sports scientists and swimming coaches, thanks to whom swimming is evolving constantly. Hope you will enjoy it! More interesting things are on the way…

Visit the blog that houses all of the research:
sswimt.wordpress.com

Like them on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Sswimt-465715247150211/

Follow them on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/sswimt

SSP 020: Learn if Circumin Reduces Inflammation, Whether Inflammation is Helpful, and If Athletes Take too Many NSAIDS with Dr. David Rowlands

This episode of the Swimming Science Podcast features Dr. David Rowlands.

Prof Rowlands’ research is focused on the role nutrients play in metabolic, molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern skeletal muscle responses and adaptation contributing health and physical performance. The work target nutrients: specifically, protein and amino acids for post-exercise recovery and skeletal muscle adaptation in both athletes and diabetics, nutritional supplements to manage pain and inflammation, and carbohydrate blends for energy-hydration and performance. Recent research also included work on the effect of environmental and technical (titanium impregnated sports garments) interventions on running mechanics, while stable and radio isotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance were employed to determine intramuscular metabolism with reference to starvation, diet and insulin resistance.

In this episode we discuss his latest research article: Curcumin supplementation likely attenuates delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Here is a list of all Dr. Rowlands research.

IN THIS EPISODE, YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT:

  • Inflammation and sports.
  • What is circumin.
  • Learn if circumin reduces inflammation.
  • If reducing inflammation benefits sports.
  • The short- and long-term effects of inflammation.

Right click here and save-as to download this episode to your computer.

LINKS AND RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:

THANKS FOR LISTENING!

Thanks for joining me for this episode. I know the conversation broke up a few times and I apologize, I’m still very new with this! If you have any tips, suggestions, or comments about this episode, please be sure to leave them in the comment section below.

If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.

SAY THANKS TO THE DAVID!

If you enjoyed this podcast, tell David thanks in the comments and if you have any questions, please post them below!

The post SSP 020: Learn if Circumin Reduces Inflammation, Whether Inflammation is Helpful, and If Athletes Take too Many NSAIDS with Dr. David Rowlands appeared first on Swimming Science.

Swim Practice Protein Intake

Take-Home Points on Swim Practice Protein Intake:

  1. Ingesting protein during training can minimize muscle breakdown from training.
  2. Protein should be ingested in smaller quantities (10-20g) than carbohydrate (up to 80g) because they are digested slower.
  3. Consume this amount of protein and carbohydrate with large amounts of liquid (1L/32oz) to prevent a hypertonic training drink that can lead to dehydration and an upset stomach.Swim Practice Protein Intake

As an athlete exercises, skeletal muscle is broken down, this is known as catabolism.  Conversely, when protein is ingested, skeletal muscle is synthesized, or grown. This is known as anabolism. The catabolic/anabolic balance, or the balance between break down, and growth, determines long-term muscle gains or losses.  In essence, you never have exactly the same amount of skeletal muscle, because it is always breaking down or growing in small amounts.  This is an essential scientific principle to understand.

For athletes, and swimmers are no exception, increased amounts of dietary protein are essential.  I want to dispel a myth right now; PROTEIN IS NOT JUST FOR BULKING UP! Swimmers also have an increased need for protein… Trust me! Muscle soreness is a result of muscle breakdown. Even if a swimmer is doing primarily aerobic-type training, skeletal muscle is still being broken down, and needs to be repaired if the swimmer wants to stay strong and healthy day after day.

So if you accept the premise that swimmers have an increased need for protein over a sedentary individual to balance off the increased muscle break down from training, then the idea of consuming protein (anabolic) while training (catabolic) actually seems quite logical.  It’s not that simple though; the body can only absorb so much protein at one time, especially during rigorous training.

The key here is the ratio of protein to water. So protein gels or bars can work, but it can get a bit tricky when it comes to figuring out how much to take relative to the amount of liquid being consumed.  Too much protein and not enough water make what is called a hypertonic solution.  This can lead to cramping, poor digestion, and dehydration.  Alternatively, the less protein you ingest, the less protein available to prevent muscle breakdown.  Again, it’s a balancing act:

1-2% protein solution is ideal (i.e. 10-20g of whey protein in a 1L (32oz) bottle).  This can be combined with a carbohydrate solution as well (carbohydrate intake during training can delay the onset of fatigue).

Example Swim Practice Protein Intake

  • 1L (32oz) bottle
  • 10g of whey
  • 50g of dextrose (carbohydrate can be consumed in much larger amounts (up to 80g) because they are digested much quicker than protein)Swim Practice Protein Intake

This is a 1% protein solution and 5% carb solution when the bottle is filled

The key is the size of the bottle, as 20g of whey in a 500ml (16oz) bottle, is actually a 4% protein solution. This could be hypertonic.  Soft drinks are a great example of a hypertonic carbohydrate solution.  Too much carbohydrate and not enough water leads to the soft drink being hypertonic. This can dehydrate an athlete, which is why we don’t drink soft drinks during training.

Again, using a 1L (32oz) bottle ensures the ratio of protein and carbohydrate to water is simple to establish (10g = 1%) and consistent throughout training, even if athletes don’t get through the whole bottle.

By Kevin Iwasa-Madge BASc, CISSN owner of iMadgen Nutrition, and as a former top-5 finisher in the world as a freestyle wrestler, Kevin embodies the lifestyle of an elite athlete. Kevin completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph in the Applied Human Nutrition. This clinically focused program allowed him the opportunity to address a range of diseases from a nutritional approach. After graduation Kevin attained his certification in sports nutrition from the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

Athletically, Kevin has been an elite wrestler for over 10 years, competing for both the University of Guelph and Team Canada. Kevin is a former First Team All-Canadian, Academic All-Canadian, and Canadian Champion. As a varsity athlete, Kevin was short-listed for the prestigious Student-Athlete of the Year award. He currently trains with and competes for the Guelph Wrestling Club and National Team. Over the years, Kevin has worked with a range of individuals, from those looking to improve their overall health, to rugby player, football players, swimmers, professional fighters, wrestlers, endurance athletes and more.

The post Swim Practice Protein Intake appeared first on Swimming Science.

Hydration Guide for Swimmers

Take home points:

  • Drink liquids throughout the day! Bring a refillable bottle with you everywhere. You’ll be more likely to drink water if you get in this habit.
  • Drink liquids during training. Whether you’re a beginner and drinking water, or at a more elite level and have a well thought out training-drink with you, you should be ingesting 16-32oz of liquid/hour of hard training.
  • Drink liquids after training. I’d recommend using a 32oz bottle and a recovery-formula (opposed to chocolate-milk, protein-bars, or other common recovery strategies). This ensures you are getting the carbohydrate and protein you need for recovery, along with an adequate amount of water. The last thing you want to do is have something so dense or thick that you further your dehydration.
I recently received a question regarding hydration, and specifically, its importance for swimmers.

First, I’d like to touch on the fact that it is possible to over-hydrate. That is, to drink so much water it is unhealthy and possible fatal. Also of note, contrary to what some believe, over-hydration does not subsequently improve performance. In some cases, excessive water without electrolytes (in this case sodium) leads to hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is essentially when your blood does not contain enough sodium relative to the volume of blood. Having said that, this most commonly happens to athletes who are training or competing for an extended period of time in a hot environment (Not swimmers!). The bottom line is, over-hydration, or hyponatremia, is not a huge concern for swimmers… assuming they have a healthy diet. In reality we get lots of electrolytes from our diet, and unless we are sweating to a massive extent (for example training in a hot environment), then our dietary electrolytes are more than enough to maintain electrolyte levels in our blood.
But don’t let all of this over-hydration talk scare you, preventing dehydration and staying adequately hydrated is critically important to performance. Even small amounts of dehydration such as 2% bodyweight loss have been shown to decrease both endurance and power performance measures. Think about it this way, 2% of your body weight is a small enough amount that drinking an extra 32oz. of liquid in a day could be what maintains performance. Our body is just that sensitive!
There is some evidence to support the idea that athletes can adapt to perform efficiently at different levels of hydration for swmmers. So in some sense, “proper hydration” is relative to the athlete. Having said that, this still does not change the fact that said athlete would need to maintain his hydration-level, whatever that may be. So, staying adequately “hydrated” may change from athlete to athlete in the actual amount of water the body holds, but nonetheless, maintaining this “hydrated state” is still the most proven and safe way to optimize performance.
Lets talk about how to do this:
  • Drink liquids throughout the day! Bring a refillable bottle with you everywhere. You’ll be more likely to drink water if you get in this habit.
  • Drink liquids during training. Whether you’re a beginner and drinking water, or at a more elite level and have a well thought out training-drink with you, you should be ingesting 16-32oz of liquid/hour of hard training.
  • Drink liquids after training. I’d recommend using a 32oz bottle and a recovery-formula (opposed to chocolate-milk, protein-bars, or other common recovery strategies). This ensures you are getting the carbohydrate and protein you need for recovery, along with an adequate amount of water. The last thing you want to do is have something so dense or thick that you further your dehydration.
  • Be conscious of your hydration level. Are you thirsty? You’re probably dehydrated!
    Looking at your urine colour is a quick test to check hydration for swimmers. It should be clear or only slightly yellow. If it is darker then that, there is a good chance you are dehydrated!
If you want to be serious about swimming, you have to be serious about your hydration. Use these tips and come up with a system that works for you. There is a good chance your performance will benefit from it!
Written by Kevin Iwasa-Madge BASc, CISSN Owner of iMadgen Nutrition, and as a former top-5 finisher in the world as a freestyle wrestler, Kevin embodies the lifestyle of an elite athlete. Kevin completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph in the Applied Human Nutrition Program. This clinically focused program allowed him the opportunity to address a range of diseases from a nutritional approach. After graduation Kevin attained a certification in sports nutrition from the International Society of Sports Nutrition. The CISSN is the premier certification in the field of sports nutrition and is recognized by the leaders in applied sports nutrition. This certification requires Kevin to earn Continuing Education Units, maintaining his development of relevant, cutting edge knowledge in the field of sports nutrition.
Athletically, Kevin has been an elite wrestler for over 10 years, competing for both the University of Guelph and Team Canada. Kevin is a former First Team All-Canadian, Academic All-Canadian, and Canadian Champion. While at the University of Guelph, Kevin was short-listed for the prestigious Student-Athlete of the Year award. He currently trains with and competes for the Guelph Wrestling Club and National Team, recently placing 5th at the FISU World Championships.
Kevin’s expertise has been acknowledged by progressive groups such as Swimming Science and Basic Motion Therapy, whom he writes articles for regularly. Lately, Kevin spends his time guest-lecturing at colleges and working with high school, varsity, professional and national/international-level athletes.

The post Hydration Guide for Swimmers appeared first on Swimming Science.