TritonWear: Real Data in Real Time

“Competitive swimmers don’t do a whole lot to track their performances over time.” – Tristan Lehari

Until now.

If you haven’t seen or used the Triton unit, you are going to want to check it out. The Triton unit sits comfortably on the back of a swimmer’s head and sends real time data to a coach’s tablet.

What kind of data? Every metric possible: stroke count, stroke rate, speed, distance per stroke, turn time, and time underwater. Check out TritonWear’s race analysis of Caeleb Dressel’s 100 Fly from World Champs or Kylie Masse’s World Record 100 Backstroke.

Stroke count and stroke rate are so critically important in swimming. Here is what Bob Gillett said at least year’s clinic:

“This is what swimming’s all about. We call it the essence of swimming. For coaches and swimmer’s, it’s the essence of life. This is what it’s all about. This is the meaning of life. It’s a concept you must understand.”

TritonWear allows a coach to access the data of all their swimmers simultaneously. It puts the “essence of swimming” into the palm of your hand, allowing you to provide instant feedback to swimmers. If your goal stroke rate is 1.2 cycles per second, you’ll want to train at 1.2 cycles per second. That’s deliberate practice at its best. TritonWear easily disseminates this information throughout each and every swim practice automatically.

“Using technology like this really keeps the swimmers engaged in their day to day training and keeps them focused on their performance. We do a set of best average 50’s every Monday night. I can tag all those workouts and pull them all up and evaluate apples-to-apples on a week-to-week basis and watch their progress.” – Kevin Anderson, Head Coach of Mississauga Swimming

Take your swimmers to the next level. Visit https://tritonwear.com/ and request a demo today!

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Swedish Camera System: Professional Race Analysis

This blog courtesy of Nate Tschohl,
Founder of swimnerd pace clocks www.swimpractice.com

 

The future of swimming technology was on display at the FINA World Aquatics Convention (FWAC) in Windsor, Canada. The FWAC is part of the FINA soiree that also includes the Swimming Coaches Golden Clinic and the World Sports Medicine Congress. With dozens of exhibitors, lecturers, and panels simultaneously going on,  it was impossible to see it all.

I did get the opportunity to speak with Thorbjorn Holmberg and Saeed Najafi of Athletes in Motion (AIM), a Swedish company focused on race analysis.

AIM is a 23-camera system in which an entire race is filmed and the athlete’s data is captured and tracked in real-time.

The AIM system captures everything you need to analyze one’s race:

  • reaction time
  • turn time
  • breakout time and breakout distance
  • speed
  • depth
  • and stroke rate

AIM provides professional race analysis in real-time:

The real-time graphs provide visual awareness of one’s own deficiencies. It’s easy to see where your velocity fluctuates or falls off: a momentum crushing breakout, poorly judged turn, or sometimes with every single breath. Watching your stroke rate decrease over the course of a race is an eye-opening experience for an athlete. There is much that can be learned and inferred from this video-stitching software.

The main testing center for AIM is located in Lund at the Swedish Center for Aquatic Research. The race analysis software has become a value added service to swimming clinics and camps which are drawing swimmers from all over Europe.

To learn more about the AIM Race Analysis System you can visit:
http://aimsystems.se/

 

 

 

Race Analysis: Caleb Dressel 18.67 at Men’s 2015 NCAA Championships

Caleb Dressel won the 50-yard freestyle at the Men’s 2015 NCAA Championships. During this race, he broke his National Age Group record of a 18.94, which we analyzed recently.

At NCAA’s Dressel dropped 0.27 seconds, touching the wall with a 18.67. Despite this improvement in time, Dressel’s stroke count was the same:

Strokes to 15 m Strokes Last 8.6 yards
   
2 7
7 8

If Caleb’s stroke count didn’t change, how did he improve 0.27?

When we further look into the analysis, we see Dressel was ~0.2 seconds faster on his breakout. This improvement was also noted on his turn, breaking out ~0.1 seconds faster. These two areas of improvement steam from improving his underwater dolphin kicking, which he has clearly been improving, as his 100-yard butterfly has greatly improved in time over the past year.

Now, with his NCAA win, many are suggesting Dressel can make the Olympic, but I am unsure about, still due to his high stroke rate. Such a high stroke rate is hard to maintain during LCM, especially when other elite competitors have a distance per stroke (meters/stroke) of 1.2, compared to Dressel’s 1.07. Nonetheless, he should still improve 0.2 in his long course time, based off his start alone.

The post Race Analysis: Caleb Dressel 18.67 at Men’s 2015 NCAA Championships appeared first on Swimming Science.

Comparison of the Short Course Meters Woman’s 100 Breaststroke World Record

Take Home Message:

  1. The aim was to: (i) compare Ruta Meilutyte (LTU) WR in Moscow (October 2013) and Alia Atkinson (JAM) in Doha (November 2014), both with a time of 1:02.36; (ii) learn the effect of the taper on Alia´s performance (Singapore vs. Doha races, 5 weeks apart).
  2. Water entry and water break was not different comparing Ruta and Alia.
  3. Alia Atkinson showed a shift in the stroke kinematics between the Singapore and Doha events (decrease in the clean speed, stroke length and efficiency but increase in the stroke rate).
  4. Alia’s breakout was around the 8-9m and 9-10m distances in Singapore and Doha, respectively. She not only stayed underwater longer, but the turning speed was also higher (10.6% and 6.9% faster in the first and last turns).

A lot was already said about Alia´s WR and gold medal at the SCM World Championships held last December in Doha. It is great for her, for Jamaica and for the World swimming according to the reasons pointed out in a very comprehensive way in the specialized media. Let´s go back one month, November 2014. Early that month, a few weeks before the Championships, it was held here in Singapore the last leg of the 2014 FINA World Cup Series. Overall, the leg was fairly entertaining considering that: (i) most swimmers were away from home at several weeks to compete at the legs of the Asian cluster; (ii) each leg is a two-days meet packed with a lot of events; (iii) most swimmers race more than two events per day; (iv) there are claims that some of them still have training sessions between the morning and evening races; (v) probably they are looking forward to the World Championships in 4-5 weeks time. However, a couple of athletes posted very promising races, swimming at world record paces.

That time, my comment to a few friends and peers was that if Chad and Alia can race at WR pace 4-5 weeks before Doha, after a good taper, probably they will smash some records in December. So, we must keep an eye on them. Surprisingly, at least for some people, that did happen. So this bring us to today´s post: (i) compare Ruta Meilutyte (LTU) WR in Moscow (October 2013) and Alia Atkinson (JAM) in Doha (November 2014), both with a time of 1:02.36; (ii) learn the effect of the taper on Alia´s performance (Singapore vs. Doha, 5 weeks apart).

Race analysis was done as reported in my previous posts on Ruta Meilutyte’s 100 SCM World Record Race Analysis. The Doha race can be found on YouTube® and the one in Singapore I recorded on the stands.

Ruta is well known to be very quick on the blocks (i.e. reaction time). However the water entry and water break is not so different comparing RM and AA (table 1). Between Singapore and Doha, Alia covered one more meter fully immersed but only spent an extra 0.13s. Hence, one might consider that she improved the first and second glides in the start (RM: 2.43m/s; AA: 2.30m/s and 2.44m/s; an improvement of 5.8% in 5 weeks).

table 1

AA was slightly faster in the first split than RM (AA: 29.46s; RM: 29.56s) but that paid-off even though she was slower by 0.1s in the following one (Table 2). In Singapore, AA did the first split at the WR pace (29.58s). I am not sure if she was only testing paces, really wanted to break the World record but was too tired, saving energy for the remaining events of the session because she raced back-to-back two finals: the W100Br (at 06:24pm) and the W200IM (at 06:53pm). Only she and her coach have the right answer to that.

table 2

Surprisingly the Atkinson´s stroke kinematics were slightly lower than the one performed by RM (table 3). Clean speed, stroke length and efficiency (i.e. stroke index) are lower, but the stroke rate higher. Interestingly, the same trend can be verified comparing the Singapore leg with Doha´s final. In Singapore, 81.8% of the speed was related to the stroke length, while in Doha only 35.34%. So, it seems that she had a strategy based on the stroke rate in Doha, a nice and “smoother” technique in Singapore.

So far, we learned that Alia Atkinson start was quite good, and there was a shift in the stroke kinematics. This lead us to the question on how did she performed during the turns and the finish.
table 3

Over the three turns, AA increased the distance to the water break (table 4). She was doing the water break around the 8-9m and 9-10m distances in Singapore and Doha, respectively. Not only she stayed longer fully immersed but the turning speed was also higher (10.6% and 6.9% faster in the first and last turns). Regarding the finish, the difference between RM and AA is 0.06s. AA showed a slight improvement by 0.04s (1.2%) between November and December. Therefore, it seems that the turns were determinant for Alias Atkinson World Record.
table 4

table 5

To wrap-up, comparing RM and AA WR at the W100Br by the same time of 1:02.36, it seems that the start and the turns were determinants for the later swimmer´s performance. Over that race, the clean swimming relied more on the stroke rate than the stroke length or swimming efficiency. That improvement on the start and turns did happen between the race delivered in Singapore and the final in Doha. Moreover, there was a slight shift in the swimming mechanics (higher SR, lower SL).

Can’t wait for the long course meters woman’s 100 breaststroke world record showdown, any predictions?

By Tiago M. Barbosa PhD degree recipient in Sport Sciences and faculty at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

The post Comparison of the Short Course Meters Woman’s 100 Breaststroke World Record appeared first on Swimming Science.

Abbey Weitzeil 100 Free American Record Race Analsis and Video

Abbey Weitzeil swam at the 2014 Doha World Championships last week where she earned a World Record on the 200 mixed free relay. A week later she lead off her Junior National relay with an American Record in the 100-yard freestyle. Weitzeil swam 0.33 seconds faster than the former American Record by Simone Manuel, which was set earlier this month.

Obviously, it was a great swim, let us breakdown the entire race.

First 25

Clearly, Abbey was way ahead of the field on the first lap (as she easily beat the other Junior competitors). Nonetheless, she took four strokes to the first 15-m and 11 strokes over the entire first 25. Compared to Manuel’s race (when she went 46.89, in March of 2014), Abbey took two less overall strokes to the first 15-m, indicating a longer underwater phase off the start.

Second 25

On the second lap, she carried her speed from the start and split 0.21 seconds faster than Manuel’s swim from earlier in the month. Weitzeil took one less stroke on the first 15-m of the second lap, once again suggesting a longer underwater phase off the turn. She took 14 strokes overall on this lap.

Third 25

The third 25, Weitzeil had a shorter turn time, increasing her stroke count to 8 strokes over the first 15-m. Over the first 15-m, she had the same stroke count as Manuel.

Fourth 25

On the last lap, Weitzeil once again increased her stroke count and shortened her turn time. On the last lap she took 17 strokes, compared to 14 she took on her second lap.

Weitzeil and Manuel Comparison

Overall Race Analysis

Overall, Abbey had an amazing race, with more potential for improvement. Compared to Manuel’s previous American record, Abbey had a faster first and second 50, but her second 50 was 7.1% slower than her first, compared to Manuel’s 6.7% decrease in speed. It seems if Abbey can maintain her turn distance and maintain her stroke count on her third and fourth 25s, she has the possibility to come home in under 24 seconds, at 23.9 and go a 46.19! However, maintaining this speed is difficult over with her first 50.

Anyway, both Manuel and Weitzeil are promising young sprinters, with the potential to go faster!

The post Abbey Weitzeil 100 Free American Record Race Analsis and Video appeared first on Swimming Science.

Florent Manaudou 50m Power

Take Home Points:

  1. The aim of this post is to analyze the reaction time and the anaerobic alactic power over the Men´s 50m Freestyle final at the Doha 2014 World Championships (25m) that 2014 Doha World Championships Knee Flexion StartFlorent Manaudou (FN, FRA) won (20.26, WR).
  2. Lighter swimmers seem to have a faster reaction time. However, if FM is benchmarked with swimmers that have similar weight, he was better.
  3. Comparing the anaerobic alactic power for the first eight swimmers, on average, the power output was 3.714kW in the semi-finals and increased to 3.739kW in the final.
  4. While FM and Marco Orsi (ITA) increase slightly the power from the semis to the final, two of the main contenders to a medal (Cesar Cielho Filho, BRA; Vladimir Morozov, RUS) decrease it slightly.

Today’s post is on the outstanding race by Florent Manaudou 50m (FM, FRA) at the Men´s 50m Freestyle (20.26, WR). In a sprint like this an analyst must begin with the reaction times. FM reaction time is not completely impressive compared to other swimmers (RT=0.63s in the final; RT=0.62s in the semi-final). But after comparing these starts with others over this and last year, it seems that he is consistent (for more details on the definition of consistency and variability, please have a sneak peak at my previous post).

Nevertheless, we should bear in mind that FM is tall and heavy. This is pure mechanics. Heavier the body, more challenging is to change its motion (Newton´s First Law of motion). I plotted the reactions times against the body mass of the sprinters racing the final and semi-finals (Fig 1). We can see that the weights´ range is similar for finalists and semi-finalists. We have no conditions to state that one group is heavier than the other. However, on average the finalists are quicker on the block. The trend is the same if we are talking about reaction times during the heats, semi-finals or final. Good sprinters have a better reaction time. The effect of the body mass is less determinant for the finalists than semi-finalists (i.e. the slope of the trend line is higher for the semi-finalists than for the finalists). For a deeper insight on the relationship between the reaction time and the performance I invite you to read this paper and the interview delivered to this blog by the leading author.

The two circles represent FM (red is the reaction time during the final, orange during the semis). A couple of other swimmers have a weight similar to him, but poorer reaction times (We didn’t plot the prelim reaction time, as it was the same as his reaction time in the finals, this is also the case for other swimmers and why they aren’t plotted).

Based on this graph, you may think “a sprinter should be slim and light, so they have a quick reaction time”, but reaction time isn’t the only variable…

Another part of the equation of elite sprinting is anaerobic alactic power (AnAl). For a bout that takes 20-25s this is definitely the energetic pathway to be monitored. On top of that, the anaerobic alactic power is associated to lean mass (i.e. muscle power). So, one might be 0.01-0.03s slower on the blocks because is heavier, but all that muscle mass is most useful to produce power in the water.

Please understand that these last posts are prepared in a rush. I have no time to elaborate, add citations and edit the text several times before uploading it. For more details on the procedures to estimate the anaerobic alactic power, kindly refer to an earlier post. To estimate the parameter body mass for each swimmer is needed and unfortunately, I couldn’t find two swimmers body masses. Another limitation is the difference in weight listed online, compared to their actual race weight. We must use what is online, but realize this likely is incorrect.

In the 1990s, the aerobic, anaerobic lactic and anaerobic alactic contribution to total power at the 45.7m sprint (velocity: 1.97+/- 0.07m/s; average weight: 76.9kg) was reported as being 16.8, 58.2 and 24.9%. It remains to be answered if the figures are the same for world-ranked sprinters these days because anthropometrics & training method changed so much in the mean time. A paper published a couple of years ago recruited international level swimmers to perform the 200m Freestyle. They reported for the first split (0-50m) an anaerobic alactic power of 1.09 kW and a partial contribution of 41%. A 50-m freestyle is more complex than you may realize, as it is not 50m, but 2x25m. So, these are two bouts of approximately 8s (neglecting start and turns). We expected the anaerobic alactic power in these elite swimmers in the 50-m to be much higher than previously reported. The anaerobic alactic power that I got is way higher than anything else reported in the literature so far (table 1). Once again, this large difference is from the distance of the event (200m vs. 50m) and the skill level of the athletes (the most elite were the ones we tested).

During the semi-final, on average, the anaerobic alactic power was higher in the swimmers that moved on to the final (finalists: 3.714kW; semi-finalists: 3.515kW). If we compare the semi-final and the final for the first eight swimmers, the anaerobic alactic power also increases (semi-final: 3.714kW; final: 3.739kW). While FM and Marco Orsi (ITA) slightly increased their power from the semis to the final, two of the main contenders to a medal (Cesar Cielho Filho, BRA; Vladimir Morozov, RUS) slightly decreased their power. This decrease in power may explain why Cesar Cielho Filho and Vladimir Morozov had slower and slightly disappointing races.

Overall, this analysis demonstrates the complexity of the 50-meter freestyle. It also shows that reaction time is very dependent on athlete size. Also, it provides some insight, showing that anaerobic alactic power may contribute to overall 50-meter race time.

By Tiago M. Barbosa PhD degree recipient in Sport Sciences and faculty at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 

The post Florent Manaudou 50m Power appeared first on Swimming Science.

Chad Le Clos 100-M Butterfly World Record Video and Analysis

Once again, if you haven’t been paying attention to the Doha Short Course World Championships you are certainly missing out! We’ve mainly discussed the Spaniard Mireia Belmonte Garcia and Katinka Hosszu from Hungary, but today we’ll focus on Chad Le Clos from the Republic of South Africa. Chad le Clos won the 200-m freestyle on the first day, but in this review I’ll breakdown his World Record in the 100-m butterfly. In the first day of competition, three world records were set, two by the 24-year-old Mireia Belmonte-García from Spain. Mireia Belmonte-García  broke Liu Zige (CHN)’s record from 2009 in the 200-meter butterfly by 1.17 seconds, the first to go under 2 minutes. She later broke Katinka Hosszu’s 400-meter Individual Medley record by ~1 second.

Chad Le Clos 100-M Butterfly

 World Record Race Video

Chad Le Clos 100-M Butterfly World Record Analysis

First 25

Chad had a great first 25, but he came up a bit early forcing him to take one stroke before the 15-meter mark. This early ascent resulted in him taking 6 strokes for the first lap. This was C. Le Clos Knee Flexion Dolphin Kickone more stroke than the former World Recorder holder Evgny Korotyshkin during his world record swim.

Second 25

Off the first turn, Chat took 9 or 10 dolphin kicks (hard to tell from the video) taking him right to the 15-meter mark and helping him keep his stroke count at 6 strokes. He hit the wall at a split of 22.59, 0.29 seconds ahead of Korotyshkin’s World Record pace.

Third 25

Once again, Chad took 9 dolphin kicks off the second turn, allowing him to only take six strokes on the entire third lap. On this lap, he took one less stroke than Korotyshkin, two entire strokes less to the 15-meter mark.

Fourth 25

On the last turn, Chad once again took 9 dolphin kicks, but he surfaced slightly before the 15-meter mark. Nonetheless, he was able to maintain his stroke count of 6 for the lap. He took one less stroke than Korotyshkin on this lap. He snuck under the world record by 0.04 seconds, despite not outsplitting the World Record (Korotyshkin closed in 25.60 compared to Le Clos at 25.85)

Overall Race Analysis

What an amazing race, as Chad was able to take down another hi-tech suit World Record. This great swim is attributed to Chad’ early velocity and maintenance of dolphin kick distance off each wall. One must speculate that Korotyshkin’s faster closing speed in his previous World Record was aided by the high-tech suits.

Doha 100-meter fly splits

The post Chad Le Clos 100-M Butterfly World Record Video and Analysis appeared first on Swimming Science.

Why Katinka Hosszu Went Out so fast at World Championships in the 200 Butterfly

Take Home Points:
  1. The Spaniard Mireia Belmonte Garcia shaved 1.17 second to the Women 200m Butterfly WR, being the first lady swimming bellow 2 minutes (1:59.61). Silver medal was snatched by Katinka Hosszu (HUN) with a final time of 2:01.12
  2. In this post you will find the analysis of the race strategy by these two swimmers during the final and on the way to the World Championships.
  3. Considering all FINA World Cup legs, MBG did on average the first half of the race in 1:00.67 and the second half in 1:04.07; while KH 0:59.90 and 1:05.06. So, the difference between them was an advantage of 0.764s for KH in the first 100m and a disadvantage of 0.997s.

So far, the best race at the Doha 2014 World Championships (25m) was delivered by the Spaniard Mireia Belmonte Garcia (MBG) in the Women 200 butterfly final, breaking the World record by more than one second. In another piece you may find the video and an analysis to her race. Today, we will try to have some insight on the race strategy and the build-up on the way to this final. Both Mireia and Katinka Hosszu (KH, HUN) delivered some of the most entertaining races over the FINA World Cup Series this year. So, why not compare the two of them?

The best World Cup performance was delivered by MBG in the Moscow leg (2:02.99) and by KH in Tokyo (2:03.14). At the 2014 World Championships the Spaniard clocked (1:59.61, WR) and shaved 1.17 second to the record set by Liu Zige (CHI) in 2009. Katinka Hosszu clocked 2:01.12 in the same final. Both swimmers show the same typical profile, being the first half of the race faster than the second half (Fig 1). As usual the first split is the fastest. The 4th split was the slowest for the Spaniard till early October. From October onwards, the 3rd split becomes slower than the 4th.

It is more interesting is to compare both swimmers in each split (fig 2). Over time we can see a trend for a slight improvement in the reaction time for MBG. With no surprise, the split times are better in the World Championships final than over the World Cup Series. If we do not consider the World Championship race, MBG seems to be improving her split times in the second half of the race. From the Beijing leg onwards, the 3rd split (100-150m) became the slowest. I.e., the 4th split is faster than the 3rd between October and December. An excellent article for a scientific journal would need to relate these performances to the external training load (i.e. periodization). Some insight could also be gathered based on some mathematical models as we shared here earlier.  But for that, requires more time and is a post for another day…

Now we need some math to back up the analysis. Based on data in table 1 we can see that the final time between both swimmers is rather similar (i.e. the probability of existing a true difference is quite small). But, if we do the analysis by race splits we start to realize that there are moderate and large differences in the split times and reaction time. Let me share (recap?) a few lines that we hear all the time: “One size does not fit all”, “There is no right or wrong way to do the things. There is your way”, “There are several strategies to reach a given performance”. Table 2 is great to showcase that. Indeed there are different strategies to reach the same outcome.

Variability inversely correlates with consistency. If one is less consistent, than they exhibit higher variability. If variability increases than something is changing a lot over time. The change over time is higher for MBG than for KH. Mireia has been improving more in selected race splits, hence a higher variability. Their race strategy is very different during the start (i.e. reaction time), first and last splits. So, we need to investigate further what these differences are.

To learn about the differences in the split times I will profile the race (fig 3, table 2). For more details on the procedures kindly refer to a piece posted earlier comparing N. Adrian (USA) and J. Magnussen (AUS).  One concern that I should acknowledge is the low number of races available to profile the swimmers (8 races). Therefore, more than predicting the performances I am keen to understand what will be the main trend (i.e. race strategy) and who shows advantage in each split.

There is 95% of confidence to report that MBF is faster on the blocks (reaction time) and the last split. The 3rd split is an even battle between the two rivals. It is challenging to state that clearly one is better than the other. Hosszu takes the lead in the first split and in a less obvious way she keeps it in the second. Based on this, I am wondering if KH tries to take the lead in the first half of the race and get a safe gap between her and the Spaniard because the later one has a powerful finish. If in the first half KH does not obtain a large enough lead, then she may know MBF will catch her.

Considering all FINA World Cup legs, MBG did on average the first half in 1:00.67 and the second half in 1:04.07; while KH 0:59.90 and 1:05.06. So, the difference between them was an advantage of 0.764s for KH in the first 100m and a disadvantage of 0.997s. We can say this in another way, if one wants to win the race, they must have a 1st half at least one second faster than the other competitor. For swimmers, have a body length or more of advantage during the 100m turn (v=1.70m/s, i.e. to travel 1.70m distance in one second, so one body length). If we keep the same reasoning, but doing the calculations only for the races in October and November, because MBG has improved the second half of the race, we get some insight into race strategy and perhaps why Katinka Hosszu went out so fast at World Championships in the 200 Butterfly.

By Tiago M. Barbosa PhD degree recipient in Sport Sciences and faculty at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

The post Why Katinka Hosszu Went Out so fast at World Championships in the 200 Butterfly appeared first on Swimming Science.

Gracie Belmonte 200 Fly World Record

If you not paying attention to the Doha Short Course World Championships you are certainly missing out! In the first day of competition, three world records were set, two by the 24-year-old Gracie Belmonte from Spain. Gracie broke Liu Zige (CHN)’s record from 2009 in the 200-meter butterfly by 1.17 seconds, the first to go under 2 minutes. She later broke Katinka Hosszu’s 400-meter Individual Medley record by ~1 second.

Gracie Belmonte 200 Fly World Record Race Video

Gracie Belmonte 200 Fly World Record Analysis

First 50

Like most races, Katinka Hosszu took the early lead beating Belmonte by nearly 0.8 seconds over the first 50. Hosszu also took two less strokes than Belmonte over the first 50, demonstrating further distance on her turns from more underwater dolphin kicking.

Second 50

Hosszu and Belmonte had nearly identical splits over the second 50. However, Belmonte took, once again, two more strokes than Hosszu over the second 50.

Third 50

On the third 50, Belmonte outsplit Hosszu by 0.28 seconds. Hosszu took four less strokes than Belmonte over this 50 and was averaging approximately 9 kicks off her walls, compared toK. Hossu Knee Flexion 200 fly Dolphin kick 6 kicks for Belmonte.

Fourth 50

On the last 50, Belmonte outsplit Hosszu by 2.10 seconds! This equates to a 6.41% difference on the last 50. Hosszu still took one less stroke than Belmonte on the lat 50, but she took one more stroke than her on the last lap. This difference was in the difference in their dolphin kicks. On the last turn, Gracie Belmonte increased her kick count to 9 kicks, where Hosszu only took 6 or 7 dolphin kicks (couldn’t tell the exact count from the video).

Overall Race Analysis

This was one of the most exciting races I’ve seen in a while. Not to take anything away from Belmonte, but from the analysis it seems clear Hosszu’s longer dolphin kicks and poor pacing resulted in her large slow down, a 17.6% decrease in speed from her first to last 50 compared to only a 9.5% decrease in Belmonte.

Hosszu vs. Belmonte 200 Fly Splits

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